Fabric box pattern – coming soon!

It’s been years since I wrote pattens for an insulated lunch bag and drawstring gift bag / mini towel. I had lots of fun with them and had plans to do more patterns, but had since been struggling to find the time (I know, excuses, excuses….). Finally though, I’m working on another pattern – this time fabric boxes elephant fabric box by piggledee   Why fabric boxes? Well, everyone loves them. They are not only useful, but they instantly brighten up any space in your house. The boxes are also a snap to make once you get the hang of it, and the satisfaction level when you make one is immense. Trust me. You can’t just make one. Echino fabric boxes by Piggledee Actually I have written a mini tutorial on a fabric box before, but this time I’m using a different construction method, which is quicker to cut, sew, and wastes less fabric. I’ll be offering several size options, but more importantly, I will show you how to draft your own custom-size box.  Here are some sneak peak of the pattern-making process. Aren’t these bright fruity fabrics gorgeous? They are my current favorite, by Cloud 9. They are organic cotton corduroy, and they are great for zakka sewing. I’ll write more about them in another blog post. fabric box tutorial photo by Piggledee fabric boxes for new pattern by Piggledee   Here are my kids “helping out” with a photo shoot. Can you guess what they were bribed with? kids helping out with photo shoot Piggledee kids helping out with photo shoot Candy, of course! fabric boxes by Piggledee Would you like to know when the pattern is ready for purchase? Please sign up to receive an email notification of my blog post, and/or newsletter! Both signup boxes are at my front page. With the Facebook reach rather dodgy these days, I’d really love to keep in touch with you on this blog.  cloud 9 fabric boxes for Ppiggledee pattern Stay tuned!

New and improved sandwich bags

Sandwich bags are one of those seemingly simple products that are, in fact, troublesome to make. Well, technically it’s not difficult to make of course. It’s just difficult to come up with the perfect design – at least for me it was. In the past I have made a zippered version like this…

Zippered sandwich bag - pink elephant

and a simple velcro version with velcro tabs at the top of the bag (the one on the right)…

Velcro-top sandwich bag - Cats

and a flap version with a single fabric like this.

Flap sandwich bag - hippos

But none of them was truly satisfactory to me. Why? Well, here are my “pros and cons” comparison notes.

Zippered Version

Pros: Neat-looking design. Food bits don’t get stuck in the velcro. Easy to maintain and wash. Probably lasts longer than velcro ones. A versatile pouch, because it’s great as snack bags (muffins, crackers, etc). Also can be used as a small wet bag, for wipes, makeup, crayons, and so on.

Cons: Fiddly to get a sandwich in and out of the bag because the zipper doesn’t open to the full width of the bag. If the zipper width is wide enough, then it’s too wide inside the bag, and the sandwich swims in it. Zipper can be fiddly to use for toddlers.

Velcro-Top Version

Pros: Nice simple design. Easy for children to use. Sandwich fits in snugly and securely.

Cons: Food can get stuck in the velcro while putting a sandwich in and out. Fluff sticks to velcro in the wash. Stitch lines for sewing the velcro shows through – not a very elegant finish.

Velcro-on-Flap Version 1

Pros: Flaps are cute. Food doesn’t get caught in the velcro as much, because the sandwich doesn’t have to touch the velcro strips while packing and unpacking. Sandwich fits in snugly and securely. Velcro is easier for kids to use.

Cons: The one-fabric design only works with non-directional prints – meaning, fabrics that have no upside and downside. The flap section was small, and it took some force to rip the velcro open. The stitch marks around the velcro strips can be really noticeable. And then there is the issue of washing velcro, and a possibly short lifespan of velcro products.

New!! Velcro-on-Flap Version 2

Version 2 of flap-style sandwich bags

So this is my latest sandwich bag. Is this the “perfect” sandwich bag I was seeking? I think it’s very close. Here’s the “pros and cons” assessment:

Pros: I love that I can slide a sandwich in and out of the bag smoothly, without worrying about food getting caught in the zipper or velcro tab. The sandwich sits in the bag snugly and securely – not as snugly as with a sandwich wrap, but close.

I also love the two-fabric design. It allows me to use rather special fabrics for the small flap section, while keeping the cost down somewhat by using plain cotton linen canvas fabric. I can also use directional prints this way, because the print is used only for the flap bit.

The flap section is larger than the first flap version, which adds to the cuteness factor. More importantly, the large flap allows an extra-wide space between the edge of the flap and the velcro strips. You can grab onto this bit of fabric to open the velcro easily – very child friendly.

Version 2 of flap-style sandwich bags - view with the flap open

If I use busy prints for the flap section, the stitch lines for the velcro are not noticeable. Pretty elegant looking overall.

New sandwich bag - closeup of the flap

Cons: The only cons here are the inherent problems associated with velcro – tricky to keep clean and wash, and the lifespan may not be terribly long. Of course, if the velcro stops sticking after a couple of years, it’s easy to replace them – so I hope people will not throw these pretty bags away!

Version 2 of flap-style sandwich bags - Liberty Hello Kitty bags

How adorable are these Liberty Hello Kitty sandwich bags? They are so pretty, in fact, that you can use them for other things like pens and crayons (the waterproof nylon lining comes in handy here). If I attach a shoulder strap, it’ll be such a cute little girl’s bag, too, don’t you think?

These sandwich bags will be available at my upcoming Facebook market day, and will be listed on Etsy later on.

New sandwich bag lineup

 

Hello Kitty madness

I need to admit… since my last post I have officially become obsessed with Liberty Hello Kitty fabrics. I can’t stop thinking about what other little things I can make with those fabrics. Why little things? Well, aside from not needing much fabric, those Liberty fabrics really shine at a small scale, because the prints are so detailed and crisp. Besides, little things are inherently cute, don’t you think, and I have a tendency to be obsessed with tiny creations.

Liberty Hello Kitty sun hats

Aren’t these sun hats pretty? Okay, they are not exactly “little” – they are for 3 year olds. But still, hats don’t require too much fabric in the scheme of things. Each hat takes less than 1/4 meter of the main fabric.

Liberty Hello Kitty hats being made

Here’s a shot of the hats before they had linings. The Liberty fabric is very lightweight, so I fused it first with woven interfacing to give it the body a hat needs.

Liberty Hello Kitty sun hat with pink stripes

This one has pink and white stripe lining, which is very girly and dreamy.

Liberty Hello Kitty sun hat with bright pink lining

This vivid-colored hat has solid hot pink lining. The lining is important because you’ll see it when you wear this hat with its brim rolled up. It’s fun to have a different fabric peeking under the brim. These hats are actually reversible, but seriously, would you ever wear them to hide the gorgeous Kitty print?

And while at it, I couldn’t resist making something else to go with these hats.

Liberty Hello Kitty mini handbags

Mini handbags! I had so much fun making them. These are just little zippered coin purses basically, but with the little handles, don’t they look like handbags?

Liberty Hello Kitty mini handbags as a phone case

They may be small, but not completely useless. I could fit an iPhone in it, so a grownup could use it as a phone case. They are lightly padded as well.

Liberty Hello Kitty mini handbags as a phone caseNow, what else can I make with these fabrics….? To be continued.

Liberty Hello Kitty fabrics… and DIY covered button hair ties

I am not a huge Hello Kitty fan. I mean, I probably was when I was 8 or so, and all the little girls in Japan loved everything with Hello Kitty on it. I know the Cat has since become an international icon of cuteness, but I never quite understood why.

So when I first saw Hello Kitty fabrics from Liberty of London (was it a few years ago?) – I didn’t get it. To me, Liberty of London tana lawn meant top-quality, luxury fabric for grownups. These fabrics are super expensive, and frankly, just too good for children who’d smear spaghetti sauce on them. And Hello Kitty meant… well, “childish trinkets” comes to mind when I think of it. Liberty and Hello Kitty just didn’t seem to mix.

Until I saw this fabric.

Liberty Hello Kitty Art fabric

Wow! So beautiful and cheesy at the same time. The design is so clever in that, while the cats are everywhere, they are well-blended into the overall pattern – you probably wouldn’t even notice the cats when looking from a distance. Instead of being the main thing, Hello Kitty has become dots, flowers, and colors.

When I learned that these fabrics are only available for sale in Japan in limited quantities, I had to order some right away. Never mind the exorbitant price tag.

Hello Kitty Liberty fabrics

And these arrived yesterday. I love, love, love them. The silky quality of Liberty Tana Lawn fabric, combined with the detailed and crisp print, and the silly cuteness of colourful cats everywhere, is a winning combination – even for a grownup I might say.

Hello Kitty Liberty fabrics - selvedge

 

Here’s what the selvedge looks like: Printed in Japan, and for sale only in Japan. It’s not allowed to make products out of this fabric for sale.

Now the dilemma was, on one hand these fabrics were too precious to cut into. On the other hand, I was dying to play with the kitties because they were too darn cute. Hmm… The solution?

Hello Kitty Liberty covered button hair ties

Covered buttons of course! Made into girly hair ties! These were so easy and satisfying to make – and require only a tiny amount of fabric. Would you like to give it a try? Here’s what you need:

Materials needed for covered buttons

You can buy covered button sets from a craft shop, or online. They are pretty cheap in bulk and come in different sizes. Each set has a rounded, outer button and the backside panel. Make sure they come with the mould tool, or buy it separately. I bought mine here.

Step 1: Make a template with clear plastic so you can “fussy cut” the fabric. The button kits I had are about 1 1/8″ in diameter. The template should be a circle with about 2 1/8″ diameter. I marked the center of the template, so it’s easier to place a desired object – say, a Kitty face – right in the middle of the button.

Step 2: Place the template onto the right side of the fabric, and trace around it with a pen.

covered button DIY - cut fabric

Step 3: Cut the fabric.

covered button DIY - cut fabric

Step 4: Sandwich the fabric between the mould and the rounded outer button. Make sure the right side of the fabric is facing the mould side. Press the button into the mould.

covered button DIY - setting the button

 

If you have a clear mould, you can check from the other side if the pattern is placed where you want it. You also have to be a little careful with very lightweight fabric like Liberty tana lawn, because the fabric can get stretched out of shape — and the pretty face of the cat could be distorted. If you are not happy here, you can take the button out the mould and start again, till you get the result you want.

covered button DIY - place fabric on mould

Here the fabric is pushed all the way in.

 

covered button DIY - back of button

Step 5: Press the back of the button into the mould till it clicks in. I just use my fingers here, even though the mould comes with a little tool for pushing the back panel in (it’s the little round blue thing you see in the photo above).

 

Step 6: Pop the button out of the mould, and that’s it!

Step 7: Thread a narrow, commercial hair tie through the loop hole in the back of the button, and you just made the world’s prettiest hair tie for your little girl – or for yourself.

covered button DIY - threading hair elastic

You can also buy covered button kits with a flat back, without the loop hole. You can glue them onto DIY hair slides, or magnets, or little pegs… the possibilities are endless.

Backpack envy

My son started attending a Steiner preschool this year. My daughter, who attended that same preschool last year, has moved up to their “Little Kindy” classroom. So to celebrate this milestone of both my kids going to the same “big school,” I promised them each a new backpack.

Until now I had been packing the kids’ school and daycare stuff in large nappy-bag style bags I made. But when my kids see all the other children going to school wearing (mostly bright-colored plastic) backpacks, they naturally wanted backpacks just like them. Yes, peer pressure.

Well, I really dislike the look and feel of plastic backpacks, but I didn’t want my kids to feel left out at school. So I wanted to make nice fabric backpacks that still resemble the shape of plastic ones.  Here’s what I came up with for Mr. A.  He chose this fabric himself.

fabric backpack in black zoo print

The pattern is my own, but let me tell you, there were some struggles along the way. The first version came out terribly (I’m embarrassed to even tell you why), and the second version came out way too big. After going back to the drawing board, the third version was just right. Well, it still looks pretty big on Mr. A., but you know, he’s barely three, and will soon grow into the backpack size – I hope.

My son wearing the new zipper backpack

Here are more photos of the backpack details. It has a flap pocket in the middle, side patch pockets, and little tabs on both sides to make it easier to open and close the zipper. The strap is padded and adjustable.

zipper backpack front detail - pocket

zipper backpack side detail - patch pocketHere’s what the inside looks like.

zip backpack detail - inside view

I used a heavy-duty cotton canvas for the lining, to give the backpack a good structure and shape, like those plastic ones. I bound the raw seams with orange bias binding, just because a bit of color is fun.

A few days later, and after much nagging by Miss M., I finished her new backpack. Of course it’s pink – but I love that my kids chose the matching print. How cute!

zip backpack in pink zoo print

I have to admit this one came out nicer than my son’s. I made small improvements, like using larger tabs on the side, and using sliders for for adjusting the straps (for the black one, I used double D rings, which didn’t work too well).

zip backpack detail - side D ring tab

zip backpack detail - adjustable strapszip backpack detail - inside viewI hope my kids will be happy to wear them to school, and not feel too envious of other plastic backpacks out there….

Library bag giveaway

Well the long summer school holiday is finally coming to an end here in Australia, and it’s nearly time to go back to school – or in my kids’ case, preschool.  One thing that was good about this holiday for me was that the kids really bonded with each other. Maybe it’s only natural after spending all those weeks together, instead of going to separate preschool and daycare rooms. But I am truly grateful that they are playing together so well now, with much less fighting and tears.

Anyway, to celebrate the beginning of a new school year – and to thank all my blog and Facebook readers for their support – I’d like to give away THREE library bags to three lucky winners! These bags are my bestsellers, and no wonder, because they are super useful. You can use it for library books, for a sheet and blanket for daycare or preschool, and they also come in handy for keeping your suitcase organised for traveling. It’ll also make a great gift for a new mother, because she can cram a lot of baby stuff in the bag and toss it in the stroller basket, without having to buy an expensive nappy bag.

Rather than picking the three bags myself, I’d like each winner to pick a bag of her/his choice from what’s listed in my Etsy shop (subject to availability). So please check it out.

To enter the giveaway, just leave a comment to this blog post (not on Facebook) with your name and which library bag print you would like to have if you win.

The giveaway is open till Thursday, January 31, at 9pm Sydney time. I will then choose three winners randomly. Good luck!

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The giveaway is now closed. Thanks everyone for entering!

library bags / large drawstring bags

 

 

Circle skirt

 

 

Miss M and I had a skirt crisis the other day.  She was getting dressed for preschool — she put on a shirt, undies and tights, and then she realized that her favorite blue skirt was not there.  It was not there because it was in the wash.  She was not happy.  I took out all the other skirts so that she could pick one, but she refused.  She had to have that blue skirt, which was her favorite.  She cried.  I realised then that she needed a new favorite skirt in her wardrobe to avert this crisis in the future. 

So in the afternoon after our first zakka sewing class, I made not one but two new skirts for Miss M.  The pattern was a circle skirt from a Japanese craft book called Everyday Girl’s Clothes by Yuki Katakura (まいにち着る女の子の服).  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pattern had one seam pocket.  I had never made seam pockets before (or a circle skirt, for that matter), but it seemed simple enough.  I thought Miss M would probably want two pockets, not just one.

First I made a pink skirt, with white polka dots, with green floral fabric as the waist band and the pocket lining.  Very girly! It made me sad how much of the expensive fabric the pattern required, but it’s all right.  It was for my special girl.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The only thing about this skirt I wasn’t sure about was that the fabric was medium-weight cotton linen blend.  It was a little on the heavy side for a circle skirt.

Since I had some time left before the kids returned from daycare, I made another one, this time in a more lightweight cotton linen fabric.  I used black and white check print for both the skirt body and the waist band.  I had doubts as to whether Miss M would wear a  black skirt, so I made the lining of the seam pockets bright pink – not that you can see much of it when wearing it.  It almost looks cuter turned inside out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And Miss M’s verdict? She loved the black and white one.  She wore it for the next three days straight – so that was a big success.  The pink one though… she wouldn’t even try it on for a photo shoot… Why, why, why, I have no idea.  This just confirms my past experience that I could never predict know what my four year old would or would not like.  At least I got one out of two right.  Not too bad.   

 

 

 

 

Five reasons why you should learn to sew (learn to sew post no. 2)

So if you are interested in learning to sew, but are a little hesitant to actually get started, here are my reasons why you shouldn’t wait any longer, and just do it. 

(1) Sewing is about self-sufficiency

In the old days, everyone (well, maybe most woman) sewed because they had to. Someone had to make quilts to keep themselves warm at night, or mend torn clothes because they could not afford to throw them away and buy new ones. You might think those days are long gone (thanks, Walmart!), but you know what, I have a feeling those good old days are coming back.  

The days of $5 shirts and $10 sweaters made in China will be over soon. The world is running out of oil. The price of cotton is on the rise. Long-suffering garment workers in third-world countries are demanding better pay and working conditions (as they totally should). Soon, it’ll be a matter of economic necessity for us to stop and think before tossing that pair of toddler jeans in the bin just because there is a hole in the knee area – or that once-pristine white bib that now has a patch of spaghetti sauce stain on it that doesn’t come off. 

That’s where your sewing skill comes in handy.  How hard is it to mend torn jeans, and maybe apply a faux leather patch to make the jeans cuter than it was before? Not hard at all. Or appliqué a little heart-shaped fabric over the spaghetti stain on the bib? You just saved yourself a lot of money and made your kids happy. And you didn’t even need a sewing machine. Same idea if you lose a button on your skirt, or buy a dress that should be 5 inches shorter.  Being able to sew is like being able to change a lightbulb yourself and not call an electrician.  It’s empowering.

(2) Sewing saves you money

It is related to my first reason above, but sewing does save you money.  Especially if you are in an anti-“made in China” (pro human rights) mindset, or if you have a taste for having beautiful things around your house (luxury items are always expensive!) 

 

Here is a stack of double gauze handkerchiefs I made last night (yes, in one night).  I was inspired by necessity, as usual, because the kids and I all have a cold and are in constant need to wipe our noses.  Sewing skill required: minimal. Money saved: ??? I think I’ll list these handkerchiefs in the shop for about $10 each… See, I hope you don’t buy them and start making your own instead!

(3) If you sew clothes, you’ll wear clothes that fit you better.

Do you find it difficult to find ready-made clothing that fits you well?  People come in all sorts of shapes, so it’s no wonder that most people won’t fit into standardized sizing of ready-made clothing.  For instance, I always have trouble finding pants and skirts that fit me – if it fits snugly around my waist, it is too tight around my hips.  If it is just right around my hips, the waist is too loose.  Same story with the tops and dresses, because I suppose an average size 4 mannequin would come with a bigger bust than I do.  

So when I first took up sewing, I made a few skirts.  They were not very well made — the supposedly “invisible” zippers were very visible, and I chose wrong fabrics (I used a lot of quilting cotton for wearables, which was a mistake — but more on this in a later post).  But I wore them all the time anyway because they fit me.  And it’s such a joy to wear clothes that fit you properly.  These days I don’t have much time to sew my own clothes.  So even though I can probably make better-looking skirts now that my sewing skill has much improved, I still wear those wonky skirts I made years ago because they are so comfortable.   

And the problem of fit isn’t just with grownups.  Children come in all sizes and shapes, too.  If you knew how to sew even the simplest garments, like summer shorts and simple dresses, your children will thank you.

 

Here’s an example.  I made these wide shorts for my two-year-old son , who has a lovely curvy bottom.  Combined with a bulky cloth nappy he was wearing at the time, I had a hard time finding pants that would fit him (and not be a mile long).  So I found a pattern for wide shorts, and cheap cotton seersucker fabric I found for $5 a meter, and made several pants like these.  Each took less than an hour to make.  My son loves them, and wears them all the time even on freezing cold days.

(4) If you have kids, they would LOVE the things you make

It’s true.  I know I’ve written about Miss M’s famous inclination to reject the clothes I lovingly make,  but deep down she really adores that I make things for her.  I know this because when she goes to daycare of preschool, she proudly tells everyone “Mommy made this!” (Or this, or this….)  Kids know that you are taking the time to make them something special.  And even if it is a really small thing, like an appliqué on an old bib, they feel the love and appreciate it – even when they don’t quite like the way it looks. 

(5) And finally…. sewing can be fun.

Sewing is fun for me, and for a lot of hobby sewers.  It offers a creative outlet in an otherwise-hectic life filled with mundane chores — be it a nine-to-five office work or taking care of little ones day in and day out.  You don’t have to be a “creative” person to begin with.  I believe for a lot of people, like me, creativity comes with practice.  There are lots of beautiful fabrics in the shops, and easy-to-follow instructions or patterns.  At first all you do is just blindly follow the instructions, and that’s totally fine.  Because when you end up with something you created, it’s very satisfying.  Over time, with practice, I bet you’ll find that you are a creative person after all, and may start making your own patterns, modifications, and even fabrics.  

Well, I rest my case for now.  My next post will be how to find a cheap sewing machine. 

Quilts I made

Today I am thinking about quilts.  Maybe it’s because I was attaching a binding to a quilt I was making for a little girl who lives next door last night.  Maybe it’s the crisp autumn air this morning that made me want to cuddle up in a nice warm quilt.

So just now I walked into to a  local fabric shop and on impulse, bought enough fabric to make my son a new quilt.  Because I have never made him a proper quilt before.

While I am contemplating the design for my son’s new quilt, I thought I’d share with you some of the quilts I had made before.

This is my very first quilt, a cot quilt for Miss M when she turned one.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a modified version of Denyse Schmidt’s triangle quilt pattern.  Doesn’t it look simple? Well, it was really hard for me back then. I can’t remember how many of those triangles I had to unpick, so the points match up (more or less).  Probably close to half.  It took many months to complete, and for that reason is my all-time favourite quilt.  It is machined pieced and hand quilted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This one is a picnic-sized (about 1.5m square) quilt in bright bold colours, from one of Kaffe Fasset’s patterns using “S” blocks.  Also machine pieced and hand quilted.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the largest quilt I have made so far, in queen size, for our bedroom.  It’s a very simple pattern of blue rectangles on white background.  Machine pieced and machine quilted.  I realised then that I wasn’t a big fan of making huge quilts – too heavy and cumbersome to manage!  I nearly gave up, and had to have this one professionally quilted for me.  Since then I have only made baby-sized ones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simple baby play quilt in red, white and light blue – machine pieced and quilted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green pinwheel quilt – machine pieced and hand quilted.

See, I was too lazy to take new photos of my quilts, and I have never taken proper photos of my finished quilts.  So what you see here are glimpses of my quilts in action, so to speak.  I use these quilts everywhere – on beds, on the floor, outside on the lawn, on the coffee table (actually I don’t remember why this one ended up on the coffee table), absorbing drools, baby wee, and beverage spills.

There are actually more little quilts around my house, and I love them all.  They are all simple in design.  Not because I don’t like complicated designs, I do, but it seems that only simple ones end up as finished quilts.  The rest are sitting in my “unfinished” pile, looking very pretty… but unfinished.

This is the stack of navy batik print fabrics I bought today, along with some basic whites.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arn’t they pretty?  I have no idea what I will do with them, but probably something very simple.

Birthday party

My children’s birthdays are two days apart.  So this year, like last year, we decided to celebrate their birthdays together.  It wasn’t a big party, because most of their little friends were away on holidays (note for families planning for a baby – giving birth during the summer holiday is probably not the best idea).  But still we had friends, family, and some little ones who could make it, and it was great fun.  Naturally I took the opportunity to make more things.

I made colourful bunting flags.  There are 14 flags, because I initially had a plan to print “happy birthday” on them… but I ran out of time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I made little party favour bags and traffic-coloured play-doughs to go in them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I made two cakes – banana chocolate pound cake for Mr. A, and strawberry mousse cake for Miss M.  Decorations were rather simple (because I ran out of time yet again), but I got many compliments on the taste.  Which, to me, is the main thing – many birthday cakes are stunning to look at but are overly sweet and disappointing in the substance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two days before the party, amid this buzz of preparation, I realized I didn’t have a present for my children.  At all!  Feeling ashamed, I quickly made this dolly quilt for Miss M – because she got a new doll for Christmas from her grandmother, and she’s playing with her all the time, often using my precious new fabrics she drags out of my sewing room as blankets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I used Liberty of London fabrics in my stash.  They are such beautiful fabrics, and no matter how you arrange them, they go together really well.  Machine pieced and quilted, it came together in a few hours.  The most time-consuming part was the hand-stitched binding.  It is a detail most people would not even notice unless they are quilters, but it is a little handmade touch that makes any quilt – even a doll-sized one – much more special. Now I want to make a quilt for Mr. A’s new teddy bear — but since he’s a little too young to notice my tardiness, I’ve given myself a slack.

Overall the joint birthday party was a big success.