Pocket Apron Skirt with a Touch of “Kawaii”

Okay, I might have lied a little in my last post – that I wouldn’t wear “kawaii” fabric as a garment. Because this week I made this for myself, and I’m in love.

Pocket apron skirt by Piggledee

Is it an apron? Is it a skirt? Is it a tool belt? Or… could it be a combination of all three? Yes it could! I’m not sure if it’s a “garment” per se, but I wear this all day long, so it feels like a garment.

Pocket apron skirt by Piggledee

The grey elephant border is actually pockets, divided into 6 sections. Six pockets, woohoo! Because, as a work-at-home woman with a tendency for forgetfulness and disorganisation, pockets are essential. You can say I’m totally lost without pockets. And do you know how many commercial garments come with no pockets at all? Like yoga pants. Or pyjama pants. Not to mention dresses. Without pockets, I’m constantly looking for things – my phone, pens, paper, scissors… Very frustrating.

So when I saw a naturopath / massage therapist friend wearing a short wrap-around apron with lots of pockets (handmade in Indonesia, with all the patchwork loveliness), I knew that was it! I had to have all.those.pockets. She graciously lent me her apron so I could examine it closely – and shamelessly copy the design.

Well, with a couple of minor changes. First, I wanted Piggledee cuteness of course, so used this classic grey elephant fabric remnant. The rest of the apron is 100% linen grey fabric that was chopped off from an IKEA curtain because it was too long for my windows. Recycle and reuse in action, my friends. Besides, I love the look, feel, and drape of pure linen, wrinkle and all.

Second, I made the apron wider than my friend’s, so it would look more like a wrap skirt. This way, I could leave the house and not look like I forgot to remove a kitchen apron. Here’s my friend modelling my skirt apron. It’d look more skirt-like if you wear the apron under your shirt or sweater.

Pocket apron skirt by Piggledee

Pocket apron skirt by Piggledee

Does it make sense to have pockets at the back though? Oh yes it does. The apron/skirt look so much cuter with elephants marching all over you, don’t you think? Plus this way, you can wrap the apron around you any which way you like, and still have pockets in the right spots. Except… you may not want to put your phone or scissors in the back pocket – in case you might want to sit down (yes, I did sit on my phone to learn this valuable lesson – but fortunately it didn’t crack).

I haven’t decided whether to make these for my shop. If I do though, wouldn’t it be great to use natural plain linen with some gorgeous Echino prints? I might have to make myself another one at least, just so I can wash one while using the other.

 

 

Fabric box pattern – coming soon!

It’s been years since I wrote pattens for an insulated lunch bag and drawstring gift bag / mini towel. I had lots of fun with them and had plans to do more patterns, but had since been struggling to find the time (I know, excuses, excuses….). Finally though, I’m working on another pattern – this time fabric boxes elephant fabric box by piggledee   Why fabric boxes? Well, everyone loves them. They are not only useful, but they instantly brighten up any space in your house. The boxes are also a snap to make once you get the hang of it, and the satisfaction level when you make one is immense. Trust me. You can’t just make one. Echino fabric boxes by Piggledee Actually I have written a mini tutorial on a fabric box before, but this time I’m using a different construction method, which is quicker to cut, sew, and wastes less fabric. I’ll be offering several size options, but more importantly, I will show you how to draft your own custom-size box.  Here are some sneak peak of the pattern-making process. Aren’t these bright fruity fabrics gorgeous? They are my current favorite, by Cloud 9. They are organic cotton corduroy, and they are great for zakka sewing. I’ll write more about them in another blog post. fabric box tutorial photo by Piggledee fabric boxes for new pattern by Piggledee   Here are my kids “helping out” with a photo shoot. Can you guess what they were bribed with? kids helping out with photo shoot Piggledee kids helping out with photo shoot Candy, of course! fabric boxes by Piggledee Would you like to know when the pattern is ready for purchase? Please sign up to receive an email notification of my blog post, and/or newsletter! Both signup boxes are at my front page. With the Facebook reach rather dodgy these days, I’d really love to keep in touch with you on this blog.  cloud 9 fabric boxes for Ppiggledee pattern Stay tuned!

Easter Hats

Two months ago, we sold our house in Sydney and moved to a semi-country area called the Blue Mountains. We love it here. The air is fresh and clean. The traffic is non-existent. Our new house in a bushy area is incredibly peaceful. But the move meant our kids would attend a new school – a public school. Having only experienced Steiner schools before, the new school has been as much a culture shock to me as to the kids.

For one, this school has a lot of events – and I mean a lot. Every week there is something new. Crazy hair day, cake stand sales, snake education (yes there are snakes around here), excursions, and Harmony Day dress-up. It’s hard to keep up, and I admit, I’ve failed to prepare the kids for a few of these events, much to their dismay and embarrassment.

So when the school sent us a note that we needed to “make” special hats for our kids for the Easter Parade (and oh by the way, could you also contribute cakes for the cake stand?), I saw this as an opportunity to redeem myself as a Committed Parent.

I consulted my children about the designs of their Eater hats. My 5-year-old son immediately requested a “pirate bunny” hat. My 7-year-old daughter didn’t have any ideas. So I thought I’d make her something bright and rainbow-y, because she likes rainbows. I got this Japanese hat-making book out (“Oshaberina Boshi” – or “Chatty Hats” by Yumiko Itoyama), and got to work.

Japanese hat-making book - Oshaberina Boshii

For the pirate hat, I modified this brimless hat pattern.

Japanese hat-making book - Oshaberina Boshii

I used black canvas for the hat, and dark blue canvas for the lining. I modified the pattern to make the sides wider, to make it resemble a pirate hat. Then I painted a skull-and-swords pirate symbol on a piece of fabric (yes you can laugh at my feeble attempt)…

pirate bunny Easter hat in progress

…and attached it onto the finished hat with fusible web. Lastly I made a tiny eye-patch for a store-bought bunny doll, and pinned it to the hat. Finished!

pirate bunny Easter hat finished

For my daughter’s rainbow hat, I decided on this tulip hat pattern.

Japanese craft book Oshaberina Boshi tulip hat

I used six different Kona cotton colors in pastel shades.

tulip rainbow hat in progress

Then I pinned some store-bought pastel eggs at the top for the finishing touch.  

Rainbow Easter hat finished

I was very pleased how these hats came out. And the kids seemed happy as well!

 

 

pirate bunny and rainbow Easter hats

I didn’t forget to make carrot cupcakes for the cake stand, either. 

Carrot cupcakes with cream cheese icing

The Easter Parade was so much fun to watch. It wasn’t quite what I expected though, because other kids had truly crazy and bright-colored hats, which looked like they were made by the kids, not the parents. The black pirate hat especially looked demure and tame among the ocean of colors….

School easter hat parade

But it doesn’t matter! Because for once I felt like a Committed Parent on top of a school event. And my kids were happy to wear the hats I made, sing happy Easter songs with their classmates, and eat yummy cakes for lunch – though maybe not necessarily in that order.

I hope you all had a happy Easter weekend!

Spoon and Fork Case with Reusable Serviettes

For this week’s “Sunday Funday” sale, I made spoon + fork utensil case and mini serviettes, to go inside a chid’s lunch box for school or daycare. I used organic cotton prints from my stash. Piggledee spoon + fork utensils casePiggledee spoon + fork utensils case with a serviette   Aren’t they cute? I love the tulip fabric in particular. The cases are just little padded bags, with a small velcro closure in the middle. It fits one spoon, one fork, and one small serviette. The padding inside makes the case soft and cushy. I hope this set will make children smile at school lunch time, holding the cushy case to take out their favorite utensils. I hope they’ll feel a little more loved – even if the lunch itself might consist of dinner leftovers. Piggledee spoon + fork utensils case Piggledee spoon + fork utensils case with a serviette I lined these cases with coordinating organic cotton prints. Yes they might get dirty if the lunch involves tomato sauce or something, but it’s easy to just toss it in the washing machine. Piggledee spoon + fork utensils case with blue lining Piggledee spoon + fork utensils case with blue lining I am a big fan of reusable serviettes or napkins. They feel so much better on your face than paper ones. We use them at home all the time, as well as for the kids’ school lunch boxes. Piggledee reusable serviettes or napkins Piggledee reusable serviettes or napkins Even though the utensil case has a simple design, I spent hours coming up with it. In my mind I thought of zippers, tabs, flaps, ribbons, and other closures, and then ruled them out one by one. I thought of using nylon lining, then I ruled it out. I thought of a tall design but decided to go with a wide design. I love this process of coming up with the perfect design – and in the end, it’s often the simplest design that works best. I hope to make these cases in grownup prints next time. Piggledee spoon + fork utensils case with a serviette

Teapot Cozy

It’s getting cold here in Sydney. I love fall dearly, but I don’t love how quickly my tea or coffee gets cold, before I even have a chance to drink it.  A constant supply of hot beverage is essential to keep me going, especially when I work my “night shift” in my sewing room.

So last night, I decided I needed a teapot cozy. 

Piggledee photo fo a potholder pattern in progress

I began by playing with paper. I’m terrible with maths, so the only way I can come up with three-dimensional patterns is by trial and error. Making a pattern using paper is easy and inexpensive. You draw something to start with on paper, cut them out and put them together with sticky tape, and try it on a teapot. If it doesn’t fit, you cut off excess paper or add extra bits to the pattern, until it’s a perfect fit. 

 

Piggledee teapot cozy pattern in progress

It took a few tries to get here, but the rest is easy. You copy the tattered pattern onto a clean piece of paper and smooth out the lines. Now you are ready to sew up a sample!

Piggledee photo fo a sample teapot cozy with cat fabric

I love this cat fabric by Japanese designer Megumi Sakakibara. It’s 100% linen – gorgeous, isn’t it?

Piggledee photo of a sample teapot cozy with cat print

This is a view from the other side. And there is a surprise! The teapot cozy is reversible.

Piggledee teapot cozy sample with flannel fabric

For the reverse side, I used a flannel-like fabric by another favorite Japanese designer, Mico Ogura – isn’t the small-scale winter scenery appropriate for a teapot cozy?  There is a layer of Insul-Bright inside, to keep the teapot warm.  I finished the bottom with a brown linen bias tape.

Piggledee sample teapot cozy hat

And the cozy also doubles as a silly baby hat!

I stayed up extra late last night to actually test out my new cozy. Did it work? Yes, it did! No more going back to the kitchen for my second cup of tea to be microwaved. Hooray! 

 

 

 

Tutorial: Mother’s Day apron

My mother loves aprons. She adores them so much that she wears them pretty much all the time at home. I haven’t worn an apron myself since my pastry chef days, but doesn’t it look cute on my mother? This is the apron I made for Mother’s Day this year (along with a few placemats using the same fabric), using a lovely cotton linen blend canvas from Japan with drawings of vegetables on it.

mothers' day apron

 

Are you an apron fan? Or maybe your mother is? Then it’s really easy to make, even without a proper pattern. Just use whatever apron you already have and like, and make a pattern from it – I’ll show you how.

Step 1: Copy a pattern from your favorite apron.

Press your favorite apron well, and place flat on a large piece of paper. I’m using a thin tissue paper for pattern tracing, which you can buy at a sewing supply shop. You can use any large piece of paper you have, of course, but having this semi-transparency helps in the step below. 

making an apron pattern from an existing apron

First, make sure there is enough blank space on the paper around the apron, to add seam allowance later. Then trace all the way around the apron with a pen or pencil.

tracing around the apron

Next, you are going to clean up those lines you just traced. Fold the marked pattern vertically in half (fold along the dotted “center fold line” on the diagram below), more or less matching the left and right sides together. See, this step is easier to do if you used the semi-tranparent paper.

Chances are the lines for the left side don’t exactly match the lines for the right side, because your apron has been worn and washed many times, and it has lost the original sharp, symmetrical lines.

apron pattern making diagram 1

With the draft pattern folded, re-draw neat, straight lines over your original tracing, using a ruler (except for the armhole curves). Make sure (1) the top hem line and the bottom hem line are aligned parallel to each other, (2) the two straight sides are parallel to each other, and that (3) the straight sides are at 90 degrees from the bottom hem line. Basically, if you extend the side seam and top hem lines till they meet, the apron outline should be a perfect rectangle shape. I hope this diagram helps.

Now is a good time to modify the pattern to your liking. If you’d like a longer apron, just add some lengths to the side seams. If you’d like a wider apron, so it will wrap over your body for better coverage, just extend the armhole lines a bit on each side, to make the apron wider.

Next, you need to add seam allowances to the pattern. Add 1 3/8″ (3.5cm) to the top and bottom hems. Add 3/4″ (2cm) to the sides, and to the curved armhole hems. The drafting part is all finished now!

apron pattern making diagram 2 - adding seam allowance

With the draft pattern still folded in half, cut the pattern out along the seam allowance lines (but don’t cut along the folded center!) – so you’ll end up with one big apron pattern piece.

Finally, make a paper pattern for a rectangular pocket, too. Any size of your choosing is fine, but 13″ wide x 10″ high (33cm x 27cm) is a good size that includes seam allowances.

Step 2: Cut the fabric and cotton tapes.

Now that you have the pattern, the rest is easy! Choose any medium to heavy-weight woven fabric for the apron, such as canvas or home decor / interior fabric. Linen or linen blend fabric will make a particularly lovely apron. Quilting cotton is not recommended, because it is too lightweight. Prewash and press the fabric well.

Pin the apron pattern over the fabric, and cut along the pattern.

apron making - cutting fabric from a pattern

It’ll be most accurate if you first mark the outline of the pattern onto the fabric with a pen and a ruler, and then cut along the marked lines. But for things like an apron, there is little harm done if you choose to just pin the pattern onto the fabric and cut the fabric along the pattern.

apron making - cutting fabric from a pattern

Cut the pocket piece, too.

Cut two lengths of lightweight cotton tape (about 1″ or 2.5cm wide) for the neck tie (one for each side, to be tied together at the desired length by the wearer), and two lengths for the waist ties. Again, any length you like is fine. My suggested lengths for a thin-to-average sized woman is 21″ (55cm) each for the neck ties, and 35″ (90cm) each for the waist ties.

You can buy lightweight cotton tape in bulk quite cheaply online. Try searching on eBay or Etsy, for example. I use them for a lot of things, from lunch bag handles to bunting making.

rolls of white cotton tapes

Step 3: Make the pocket and attach it.

Fold over the top edge of the pocket at about 3/8″ (1cm), and then fold it again to make a double-fold hem. Stitch along this folded edge. Fold the sides and bottom edges of the pocket at about 3/8″ (1cm), and press well. apron making - making the pocket

Pin the pocket to the middle of the apron.

apron making - pinning the pocket

Stitch around the sides and bottom of the pocket onto the apron, stitching close to the edge (about 1/12″ or 2mm from the edge). Then stitch around the sides and bottom again, at about 1/2″ (1.3cm) from the edge. This second round of stitching (1) makes the pocket more securely attached to the apron body, and (2) conceal the raw cut edges of the pocket inside the double stitching. So if you look inside the pocket, it’ll be nice and clean.

Step 4: Sew the curved armholes.

Fold over the raw edge of a curved armhole in, at 3/8″ (1cm). Press. Then fold it again at 3/8″ (1cm), to make a double-folded hem. Press. 

apron making - folding side armholes

Sitch along the fold. Repeat for the other side.

Step 5: Sew the top hem.

Fold the top hem over at about 3/8″ (1cm), and then fold it again at about 1″ (2.5cm) to create a double-folded hem. Press well. Insert a piece of cotton tape (for the neck tie) into this fold, close to each end of the hem. Pin.

apron making - inserting cotton tape at top hem

apron-making - top hemStitch along this top hem, close to the folded edge. Your stitching will attach the cotton tapes to the apron at the same time, with the cut edge nicely concealed inside the folded hem.

Now fold each cotton tape over towards the top (so the ties will face upwards towards your neck, not droop downward toward your feet), and pin. Topstitch along the very top of the apron, stitching over the cotton tapes along the way.

apron making - topstitching the top hem

Step 6: Sew the sides.

Fold over a straight side hem at about 3/8″ (1cm), and then fold it again at 3/8″ (1cm) to create a double-folded hem. Press well.

apron making - folding the side hems

Insert a piece of cotton tape (for the waist tie) into this fold, at the top of this hem, and pin.

apron making - side hems

Stitch along this side hem close to the folded edge like you just did with the top hem, stitching over the cotton tapes at the same time.

Now fold the cotton tape over to face outwards (so it’s ready to wrap around your waist). Stitch over the tape in this position (just over the tape bit; you don’t have to sew all the way along the side again) – try to stitch right over the previous stitch line, so you won’t see the second line of stitches from the right side of the apron.

Repeat for the other side.

Step 7: Sew the bottom hem.

Fold the bottom hem at about 3/8″ (1cm), and then fold it again at about 1″ (2.5cm) to create a double-folded hem. Press well. Stitch along this bottom hem, close to the folded edge.

Stem 8: Finish up.

Your apron is nearly ready! Try it on, and make sure the neck ties and the waist ties are the lengths you like. If they are too long, cut them shorter. (If they are too short… well there is nothing you can do now at this point, other than unpick the tapes and stitch longer ones on in their place.) If everything looks good, fold over the raw cut edge of each cotton tape piece twice, and stitch over the fold line to keep the tape ends from fraying.

All done now! Enjoy your new apron.  (This is my mother last year, wearing last year’s Mother’s Day present!)

apron modelled by my mother

 

Insulated lunch bag pattern

Now I’d like to tell you a little about my new insulated lunch bag pattern. The pattern itself is quite simple, and I’m sure a lot of people could have come up with a design like this on their own. Originality is not a huge factor here.

There are two things I’m very happy about this pattern though – one is the computer-friendly format, and the other is the detailed instructions.

Format

I used a landscape format with one or two large photos per page, and corresponding bullet-point instructions in large, easy-to-read text.

Insulated lunch bag pattern first page

Does it look like a Powerpoint presentation? Why yes, that was the idea exactly. I used Apple Keynote for writing this pattern, and once I got over the initial learning curve (thanks to a wonderful tutorial on Lynda.com), the application was so simple and a joy to use.

I chose this format because I am terrible at following other people’s patterns. The reason for this, I thought, was that most patterns use the A4 format, with small text and tiny, infrequent photos. I am a visual person, and what I crave are large, clear photos and lots of them. Having to figure out a pattern by deciphering the meaning of text alone often makes my head spin.

So I’ve come up with a format that even a pattern-challenged person like me can follow with ease, with lots of large photos and texts in short sentences, presented as bullet points.

Another advantage of this format is that it is computer/tablet-friendly. I dislike having to print patterns, because printed patterns are easily lost, not to mention the cost of the printer cartridges and the environmental factor. My pattern fits nicely on your computer, tablet or even a smartphone screen, so you don’t have to print it out. It looks like this on an iPad.

Pink elephant with iPad

[Thanks to Su-Yin Johns for letting me use her photo.]

Of course, you might have to adjust your computer/tablet/smartphone setting so that it does not go to sleep after a couple of minutes. Having to wake it up every time you are ready for the next step can be annoying. But most of my patten testers loved this format, so I’m pretty sure you’ll love it, too. After all, this is the day and age where even my 60-something mother carries around a MacBook Air, and many of us prefer reading e-books over printed books.

Detailed Instructions

Another thing I am proud of this pattern is the detailed instructions. I wrote the pattern with beginners in mind, so they can learn new skills and techniques by making the lunch bag – kind of like a project-based sewing class. For example, inserting a zipper in the lunch bag is probably the hardest part of making the bag. So the pattern has many, many pages explaining the zipper attachment process step by step. Even if you have never made a zippered pouch before, you should be able to follow the instructions and make the bag pretty easily.

insulated lunch bag pattern zipper section

Of course, if you are more advanced in sewing, you can skip those pages and just read the sections that are new to you. That’s another beautiful part of having a tablet/computer-friendly pattern. Turning pages is effortless, and you don’t feel resentful that you had to print out 20+ pages of instructions and photos that you mostly didn’t need.

So I hope you’ll give my pattern a try. They are available on Etsy and Craftsy. If you’d also like to receive all the necessary materials to make the bag in the mail as well, you can purchase a kit as well on Etsy. And if you are not keen on making an insulated lunch bag, stay tuned for more patterns in the future.

Pattern testing – insulated lunch bag

I’m so excited to announce that my first pattern and kits for insulated lunch bags are now finished and up for sale! Why am I now writing patterns, you ask? Well, I have always wondered if other crafters might enjoy making the zakka items I create, rather than having to buy the finished items from my shops. I also feel passionate about getting people to learn how to sew. So my hope was to write patterns that are detailed enough for beginners to follow, but are still interesting for more experienced crafters.

I’d love to tell you more about the pattern and the kits in another post, but first, I’d like to tell you about the five wonderful women who tested my lunch bag pattern and kits – Erika, Bec, Su, Kristy and Sarah. At first I was hoping to get two or three volunteer testers, but was thrilled to find five! And they’ve all done tremendous work getting the kits sewn up and giving me invaluable feedback.

Here’s the lunch bag Sarah made. She chose this “boy and ship” fabric that turned out to be quite cute for this bag.

Sarah's lunch bag - boy and ship

Kristy from Monkey Mai made this lunch bag with the red bird fabric. Beautiful job!

Kristy's lunch bag - red linen birds

I was lucky to have two other professional crafters to test out my kits and pattern. Bec from Little Toot Creations is an experienced dressmaker. Isn’t her grey bird lunch bag beautiful?

Bec's lunch bag - grey linen bird

Su, another experienced dressmaker from Alice Loves Handmade, chose this pink elephant fabric for her daughter. It turned out so pretty and girly. I’m also pleased that most of my testers were able to make the lunch bags without having to print out the 20-odd-page instruction. You can see how nice the pattern looks on Su’s iPad in the photo. But more about the pattern itself later.

Su's lunch bag - Pink elephant with iPad

Last but not the least, Erika helped me out all the way from Vermont, US. She’s an avid crafter, and was the one who initially encouraged me to write patterns. She made not one but two lunch bags using her own fabrics – because sending kit materials to the US would take so long. I love both her bags! She made her own handles, too, which add a lot to the design, don’t you think?

Erika's lunch bag - Hello KittyErika's princess lunch bag

I really enjoyed working with all the pattern testers, and feel that they are now part of my team. It gets lonely sometimes working alone in my studio at home. So even though I have never met any of the testers personally or even spoken to them on the phone, it’s been wonderful to have this teamwork experience by email. It just shows how generous and supportive this crafting community is. Thanks a million for your help, and I look forward to working with you again in the future!

Backpack envy

My son started attending a Steiner preschool this year. My daughter, who attended that same preschool last year, has moved up to their “Little Kindy” classroom. So to celebrate this milestone of both my kids going to the same “big school,” I promised them each a new backpack.

Until now I had been packing the kids’ school and daycare stuff in large nappy-bag style bags I made. But when my kids see all the other children going to school wearing (mostly bright-colored plastic) backpacks, they naturally wanted backpacks just like them. Yes, peer pressure.

Well, I really dislike the look and feel of plastic backpacks, but I didn’t want my kids to feel left out at school. So I wanted to make nice fabric backpacks that still resemble the shape of plastic ones.  Here’s what I came up with for Mr. A.  He chose this fabric himself.

fabric backpack in black zoo print

The pattern is my own, but let me tell you, there were some struggles along the way. The first version came out terribly (I’m embarrassed to even tell you why), and the second version came out way too big. After going back to the drawing board, the third version was just right. Well, it still looks pretty big on Mr. A., but you know, he’s barely three, and will soon grow into the backpack size – I hope.

My son wearing the new zipper backpack

Here are more photos of the backpack details. It has a flap pocket in the middle, side patch pockets, and little tabs on both sides to make it easier to open and close the zipper. The strap is padded and adjustable.

zipper backpack front detail - pocket

zipper backpack side detail - patch pocketHere’s what the inside looks like.

zip backpack detail - inside view

I used a heavy-duty cotton canvas for the lining, to give the backpack a good structure and shape, like those plastic ones. I bound the raw seams with orange bias binding, just because a bit of color is fun.

A few days later, and after much nagging by Miss M., I finished her new backpack. Of course it’s pink – but I love that my kids chose the matching print. How cute!

zip backpack in pink zoo print

I have to admit this one came out nicer than my son’s. I made small improvements, like using larger tabs on the side, and using sliders for for adjusting the straps (for the black one, I used double D rings, which didn’t work too well).

zip backpack detail - side D ring tab

zip backpack detail - adjustable strapszip backpack detail - inside viewI hope my kids will be happy to wear them to school, and not feel too envious of other plastic backpacks out there….

Wristlet pouches

I’ve been working on wristlet pouches for a while.  So far I’ve made no less than four different versions.

red and white polka dot wristlet pouch

This was the first one.  I loved its simple construction and cute shape.

But it turned out to be a little too narrow to fit a typical women’s wallet.  I had no idea because my own wallet is very small – it’s great to have a product tester to point these things out for me.

wristlet pouch with red stripy traditional japanese fabric

So this is the wider version I made.  (aside: I used this traditional Japanese fabric, with which I’ve been in love for a while.)  Definitely wide enough for big women’s wallets.  I also started using padding for that cushy feel.  My product tester was happy.

So I made another one using this gorgeous handprinted fabric from Blueberry Ash.

wristlet pouches using handprinted fabric

Very pretty.  At this point I was still attached to the shape of the small pouch, so I made one of each.

 

But deep down I wasn’t happy with the shape of the larger pouch.  It just wasn’t cute enough for me.  So I tried this one, using a recessed zipper pattern, with a fake piping detail.  I used another gorgeous traditional Japanese fabric called “nanairo” (seven colors).

wristlet pouch with recessed zipper

The result? It was a disaster!  It wasn’t anywhere near cute.  It looked boxy and cold like a fridge.

Then I figured out what I didn’t like about it: I didn’t like the bottom of the pouch looking narrower than the top.  I also thought the pouch was out of proportion because it was too short for its width.  So I got off my lazy chair and drafted a nice rounded pouch pattern.  It should be wide enough for a large wallet, but is also slightly taller.  I scrapped the recessed zipper idea, but made the zipper ends a little neater.  Here’s a sample.

wristlet pouch final version with rounded bottoms

Now this one, I am in love.  See how cute it is with the bottom of the bag looking rounded and wider than at the top?  It doesn’t have a gusset, but it is still 3D in shape because of the little darts.  It looks so friendly and inviting, you just want to hold in your hand all the time.

green daisy wristlet pouch

Here’s the same pouch in green.  Which one do you like better – green or red?  Finally, finally the pouches are shop-ready!