Insulated lunch bag

It’s been such a hot, hot summer here in Australia. During our road trip to Adelaide, the temperature regularly rose above 40 degrees celsius.  It’s hot even back in Sydney, and the other day it was 48 degrees where we live – which turned out to be the hottest day in recorded history. Yikes.

So even though I had been putting off making insulated lunch bags till now -despite several requests from customers -, this heat wave has pushed me over the edge. As usual, my creations are inspired by necessity – I couldn’t have survived the four-day road trip through the sweltering heat without a constant supply of cold water in our Esky bag.

Here’s my new insulated lunch bag – tote bag style.

insulated lunch tote bag

For the insulation effect, I used a product called Insul-Bright. It’s just like a quilt wadding, but bulkier.  I used waterproof ripstop nylon for the lining, to keep the bag dry outside. 

At first I didn’t particularly enjoy working with these materials. I’m not a fan of synthetic materials, and the combination of Insul-Bright and nylon was was a bit too much. I think that’s why I chose this very natural-looking linen bird fabric to compensate for the mostly synthetic materials. But soon I got used to it.

And I love the result! The tote bag-style lunch bag is super cute, don’t you think? It’s small enough to be cute, but large enough to contain all that you need for your (or your child’s) lunchtime – a couple of containers, a small water bottle, a piece of fruit, cutlery… and a bar of reusable ice block to keep everything cool.

insulated lunch bag with lunch stuff inside

Next I put the bag through a rigorous (??) scientific scrutiny to test its effectiveness. I put an equal amount of ice cubes in two glass jars, and put each jar in the insulated lunch bag and my regular drawstring lunch bag, along with a bar of reusable ice block each.

The result? Two hours later, most ice cubes were melted in the normal canvas lunch bag, but most were still intact in the insulated bag. Moreover, the bottom half of the regular lunch bag was soaked wet from the “sweat” of melting ice, but the insulated bag, thanks to its nylon lining, was completely dry. Four  hours later, the ice cubes had just melted in the insulated bag, but the water was still icy cold. Success! Of course, I’m not claiming the homemade lunch bag works just as well as professionally made Esky bags. But it certainly is a big improvement over my other lunch bags.

ice cube test for insulated lunch bags

The larger bag below was the very first version of the bag I made – which turned out to be too big. But that’s okay, because it’s the perfect size for a mason jar I use to make yoghurt. I love homemade yoghurt, but I was feeling that wrapping the bottle in my child’s winter sleeping bag was a little unsightly, as effective as it is. Now I can make yoghurt in style.

insulated lunch bags, version 1 and 2

Here are some more lunch bags I made for my shop. I just love this linen bird fabrics. So beautiful.

three insulated lunch bags in linen bird fabrics

 

 

Grey elephant love

It’s no secret that I love Japanese elephant prints (made by a company called Daiwabo).  They are just adorable in an understated way, and they come in beautiful shades of pink, green and blue.

But of late I’ve been in love with the grey colorway.  Initially I ordered it for a custom-order daycare / nappy bag.  At first I thought it might be too gloomy for children’s accessories, but upon seeing its gorgeous color in person, it immediately become my favorite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the custom-order daycare / diaper bag.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doesn’t it look sophisticated with the light grey lining? I also made a matching set of zippered diaper cases for my custom-order client.

I had enough fabric left over to make my mother a tote bag in the same colorway.  She is a school teacher, and she wanted a bag to take to her school everyday.  I assumed she’d carry A4 folders, notebooks, and maybe her brand-shiny-new Macbook Air (in a matching grey color, too).  She also wanted lots of pockets (she’s a tough customer).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bag is basically in the same style as the daycare / nappy bag, but with a rectangle bottom instead of oval, is taller than is wider, and has two bag handles instead of one shoulder strap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The inside view – it has two large pockets for keys and other little things.  Combined with the two large outside pockets, I hope they satisfy all her pocket needs.

Sourcing the grey elephant fabric is a little bit of a pain…. But I think I’ll have to order some more, so I can make more bags for my shop.

Tutorial – Make your own lunch bag (or two)

Of all the things I have made for my shops, backpack lunch bags are probable the most popular – and no wonder, they are very useful.  In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to make one yourself.  All you need is:

  • a sewing machine
  • an iron
  • a pair of scissors, or even better, a rotary cutter and a cutting mat (which I’ll use here).
  • 1/2 yard or meter of fabric (you’ll have some left over) – I use canvas because it’s sturdy, but you can use quilting cotton, linen, or any woven fabric.
  • 2 x 37.5″ (95cm) of plaited cords – or ribbon or any sturdy string-like material, and
  • less than one hour of your time

Ready? Here we go!

Step 1: Cut the fabric

Cut 2 pieces of fabric, 11″ x 11″ (43.5cm).  You can make it larger or smaller if you like, but this is the size I normally use.  It’s easy to cut the pieces accurately if you cut two layers of fabric at the same time, using a rotary cutter and a mat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I often make two bags at a time, because you can get 4 11″ x 11″ pieces from one 11″ strip (using a 44″ wide fabric), and two bags come together very quickly if you make them at the same time.  Plus, it’s good to have two — you’ll have a spare when one is in the wash.

Step 2: Overlock or zig-zag the 3 edges

For each piece of cut fabric, zig zag stitch around the two sides and bottom of the fabric (you don’t have to do the top edge) to prevent fraying.  I use my overlocker here, but a zig zag stitch will do just fine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3: Sew the outline of the bag

Put the two pieces of fabric neatly together, with the printed side facing inside.  Measure 2 1/4″ (5.7 cm) distance from the top edge, and on the right edge, mark the spot using a fabric marker or pencil.  Do the same for the left edge.  The marks won’t show when the bag is finished if you mark just a tiny bit.  This is just so you know where to start and stop sewing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, make sure the two pieces are exactly laying on top of the other, and are you ready to start sewing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sew the sides with a 1/2″ (1.3cm) seam allowance, at the point where the mark is (2 1/4″ from the top).  It’s important not to skimp on the seam allowance here.  Sew around the three sides of the bag, pivoting at the corners, and stopping where you find the other marked spot.  Make sure you back-tack a few times at the start and end of this seam, to keep the bag from falling apart with repeated use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you see, I don’t use pins.  Pins are unnecessary for little things like this and they only cause trouble.  The trick is, you first anchor the needle down at the start of sewing and do the back-tack.  And then you hold the two layers of fabric at the end of the seam together, holding them so they match up.  Now gently pull the fabric towards you till the pieces are straight.  Then sew down the seam, while holding down the end of the fabrics together.

Step 4: Sew the top side seams

Now you have the three sides sewn together, with the top 2 1/4 inches left unsewn.  Press the side seams open, all the way to the top of the bag.  Like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then sew around the open edge at about 1/4″ (6mm) from the edges – like you’d sew a  slit opening on a garment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can you see that at the short bottom seam, I sewed back and forward a couple of times to create a very strong seam?

Step 5: Finish the top of the bag

Fold and press a top raw edge of the bag about 3/8″ (1 cm) inward, then fold and press again at about 1″ (2.5cm).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then sew along the edge – as close to the edge as you can.  Repeat for the other side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Again, no pins.  But please make sure you really match up the end of the seam so it looks nice and clean when finished.  Most natural woven fabrics have a little “give” or stretch, so sewing while gently stretching the fabrics works really well.

Now at this point, if you turn the fabric the right side out…. you have a simple drawstring bag done already! Well, all you need is to thread a cord. Yay! But not very long to go for a completed lunch bag, either, so hang in there.

Step 6: Thread the cords and prepare the gussets

At the bottom corners of the bag, mark little 1.5″ (3.8 cm) squares with a pen or pencil.  It’s 1.5″ from the sewn lines – not the edge of the fabric.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can use a ruler each time, but if you are making multiple bags, it’s handy to have a little paper template here.  Then cut along the marking.

Your bag will look like the photo below.  Now prepare the two cords.  If you’ve followed the sizes I’ve mentioned precisely, you’ll need 2 cords each about 37.5″ (95cm) long.  Otherwise, lay a doubled-up cord like this – a little longer than the edge of the gusset square – to measure how much you need.  You’ll need two of these.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thread the cords using a bodkin (a cheep and very handy thing to have, but you can use a safety pin if you don’t have a bodkin).   Here are my bags all threaded:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7: Sew the gussets

You are almost finished! Now, for each side, bring the two cord ends from the inside of the bag (the printed side), along the side seam, through the cut gusset opening.  Tease the gusset edges open to form a straight sewing seam, and position the cord ends win the middle of the seam, like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is one place you might want to use pins – use a pin for each cord end to secure it in the right position.  Then, with about 3/8″ seam allowance, sew the gusset seam – making sure you sew over the two cord ends a couple of times, back and forth, to make a very secure seam.  Repeat for the other gusset.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trim the end cord bits sticking out, and overlock or zig zag finish the seams.  And that’s it! Your bag is finished.  Yay!

The gusset looks like this from the right side:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now, if you’ve been making two bags at the same time, you’d be rewarded with not one but two pretty lunch bags. Very satisfying!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zipper love

I am in love with zippers right now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love that they come in a rainbow of colours.  Love that they are easy to use, and make a polished-looking product in no time.  Love that little children adore opening and closing zippers. So what happens when I fall in love with a particular material? I buy hundreds of them, in varying length and colours, ready for any new project that comes to my mind.  Never mind I have no storage space left in my sewing room.  I can’t help myself.

So far I’ve made pencil cases and nappy cases.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know, I know, everyone makes zipper pouches and has been for decades.  It is such a cliched thing really.  I have made a few pencil cases and pouches before, too.  But when I started Piggledee, I vowed not to go down the zipper pouch route, because I wanted to make things that are slightly less common.

So why the change of heart?  Well, it’s the colours.  I just “discovered” a whole range of lovely pastel zipper colours available online — whereas before, I wasn’t inspired by the same boring selection of darker colours available at local crafting shops.

Besides, as much as I love the cute Japanese fabrics I use for my shops, they don’t leave much room for creativity, because it’s those amazing fabrics that do all the talking.  With these zippers, I can have a little more fun combining the main fabric, the zipper colour, and the lining fabric.  Like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun, isn’t it?  Padded mobile phone cases, Children’s shoulder bags, maybe even laptop sleeves – Watch out, here I come!


Extra-large daycare / nappy bag

For some time I’ve been wanting to make my daycare bag (or nappy bag) a little bigger.  The original ones were just the right size for a family daycare my children had been attending at the time, and they are great for Miss M’s preschool.

But some daycares in Sydney require you to bring a ridiculous amount of stuff – a sheet, blanket, not one but two sets of change of clothes, a water bottle, sunscreen, a hat, lots of nappies and even food.  It’s hard enough to find a bag big enough to contain all the gear.  And if you are using cloth nappies, you might as well find a suitcase to fit everything in.

So when a friend wanted a daycare bag, I asked if she might want it slightly bigger.  And here it is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m quite pleased with how it turned out.  It is only about 5 cm taller than the original one, with the width being the same, but it looks huge next to my children.  No, it still doesn’t fit cloth nappies for Mr. A, but it is big enough for everything else, including a lunch bag, 4 or 5 disposable nappies, a hat, a water bottle, change of clothes, sunscreen, a cot sheet and a blanket, and a teddy bear.

As a nappy / diaper bag for casual outings, it should be large enough for everything you need.  I love the open-top shape of the bag because it’s easy to access whatever you need when the baby starts crying – snack! bottle! a clean nappy! A new mother’s sanity seriously depends on such small details that allow for a split-second response.  I don’t know how many times I drove myself insane with my commercial nappy bag with a flap and a million pockets to hide just the item I was looking for.

I think I’ll list the large version in my online shops soon, as a custom-made item.

 

 

 

Wipes

It appears I’ve been making lots of simple square things lately – table napkins, placemats, and now, wipes.  I have had a on-again, off-again relationship with cloth wipes, loving them for a while and then reverting back to the convenience of disposable ones when baby number two came along.  Now I’m back in love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A bunch of wipes for everyday use – great for using up scrap fabrics that are fast accumulating in my sewing room.  They are about 5″ x 6″ pieces of double gauze with organic cotton jersey or bamboo towel backing.

When Miss M was little (before I started Piggledee), I was too cheap to buy nice fabric just to wipe poop.  So I just cut up bits of flannel from a hand-me-down bunny wrap, finished the edges with an overlocker, and that was it.  They weren’t pretty, but they worked. This time I’m lucky to have gorgeous, luxurious, organic even, leftover fabrics thanks to Piggledee.  I don’t get bored sewing these simple squares because the fabrics are so lovely.

And of course I had to make something even lovelier for my shop:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The double gauze is buttery-soft organic cotton, with the cutest apple prints! It’s from Japan of course, and is the priciest fabric I’ve ever ordered – but thankfully you only need a little to make wipes.  For the backing I used organic cotton / hemp French terry, which has a lovely natural colour and towel-like surface.  It is the most absorbent fabric I’ve used.  Even the fabric ribbon is organic cotton.

Why use cloth wipes and not disposable ones?

(a) Most disposable wipes have icky chemicals in them that are bad for sensitive baby’s skin.  Okay, I don’t know what these chemicals are called, but isn’t it suspiciously unnatural how they never seem to dry out in a box?  Some babies seem to suffer from chronic nappy rash due to disposable wipes.

(b) Cloth wipes are easy to use and more effective for poopy mess than those thin, slippery disposable ones.  I used to use 4-6 or more disposable wipes to get a job done.  I only need one or two of my thick wipes on the other hand.

(c) Disposable wipes are expensive. As with cloth nappies, they will save you a lot of money in the long run.

(d) Disposable wipes are bad for the environment.

Also, like I said before about placemats and napkins, having pretty, high-quality accessories at otherwise stressful or no-fun times does wonders to brighten up your mood.  Wiping sticky messy poop from a squirmy two-year-old’s bottom? Not one of the highlights of a day – but at least I get some pleasure using those gorgeous pieces of fabric.



Mealtime accessories

I’ve been shopping around for a perfect fabric for making child-sized placemat and napkins.  Then this week I found it, right in my own sewing room among a pile of fabrics I hadn’t used before — 55% linen, 45% cotton dotty fabric with the most gorgeous texture and colors, from Japan of course.  Its simplicity is just right for mealtime (where the principal player should be the food, not accessories), and the large dots and pretty colors add a touch of cuteness for child appeal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is admittedly a rather pricey fabric.  A luxury fabric I would say.  You’ll just have to touch it to see what I mean.  Is it a little bit of an overkill to use such fabric for children, who may not be so discerning at the age of 2 or even 4?  Well… of course not!  Not because the little ones deserve the best, etc.  But because beautiful children’s items are not just for them, but for the parents as well.

Like when I was using drops of lavender essential oils in Miss M’s bath when she was a baby, hoping that the scent will relax and sooth her nerves.  I had no idea it did or not, but it certainly soothed my nerves and calmed me down at the end of a long day.

In my household, mealtime can be quite stressful.  Particularly dinnertime after daycare or preschool, involving super-tired and cranky children, feels like walking through a mine field.  Make one wrong move and boom! goes off the tantrum button.  “I don’t LIKE tomatoes, mommy!” “I want MILK, not water!” And so on.

Having a pretty table setting doesn’t solve all my mealtime problems, but it helps.  I love looking at pretty fabrics at the most stressful of times.  It soothes me.  And my children seem to love having their child-sized placemats and matching napkins.  I think a little touch like that makes them feel a little special.  Like I said before, kids do appreciate a little presentation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the napkins, I used soft and lightweight organic cotton / hemp fabric.  I used organic cotton / hemp canvas for the placemat backing.  Again, top-quality fabrics… but oh well, happiness is all in the details, don’t you think?


Non-towel towel

I’ve been wanting to make a bath towel for children for a long time. It’s something many children use every single day, and the commercial ones are rather boring and unappealing. I wanted something super soft and eco-friendly, with a pretty visual detail. I gathered samples from around the world for organic cotton or bamboo towel fabric. But none of them felt quite right. Some were too rough to touch, some were too expensive, and while bamboo felt very nice, I am a little confused right now about how earth-friendly bamboo is, considering it appears to take a lot of chemicals to convert bamboo into fabric.

Then one day it occurred to me. Why, a bath towel doesn’t have to be made of traditional towel material! Any soft and absorbent fabric will do. That’s how I found this perfect non-towel towel material: hemp and organic cotton blend jersey.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is hard to describe how beautiful the fabric is without the benefit of touch. It is lightweight. It has a lovely natural, off-white colour. It is very soft, but has some knobby texture to it that is warm, earthy, and welcoming to touch. Forget about your children, you just want to wrap yourself in it.

And hemp is brilliant. Before I saw this fabric, I had the impression hemp was a little on the rough side – suitable for canvas or heavier fabric, but not for something soft and delicate for baby items. Well, I was wrong about that. Or maybe hemp gets “tamed” here with the blend of organic cotton. Did you know hemp is extremely absorbent – more so than plain cotton? It is also naturally anti-bacterial and anti-fungal, and as such well suited to children’s items.

The jersey is stretchy in both directions. I bound the raw edges with my all-time favourite fabric – Liberty of London tana lawn, for that gorgeous, luxury look.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The towel is also beautiful as a swaddle wrap for a newborn. Stretchy, generous-sized, and lightweight for the Spring-to-Fall seasons. In fact, I’m not sure if I can convince anyone else to use this as a towel, so I think I’ll list it in my shop as a wrap and a blanket….

But I love this as a towel. I’ve been using it on my little ever-willing (forced?) product testers, and I’ve been very happy with its absorbency and function. It’s great for warmer weather. Moreover, don’t you hate washing heavy traditional bath towels? They take so much space in the washing machine, takes forever to dry, and what a waste of water that is. Washing this lightweight material is a breeze.

Oh, another thing about traditional towels I don’t like: after a while of use, they tends to get hard and brittle when dried in the sun. Maybe this is because of the water quality in Sydney, or because the soft ones have some synthetic material blended in it. But some of the bath towels I have turn into a sand paper when I dry them, I wouldn’t in a million years want to use that on my skin.

Here’s Miss M wrapped in her new favourite towel. She insists on sleeping with it as a blanket, too. I love it when she approves of something I make…. because as you’d know if you’ve been reading my blog, it doesn’t happen very often!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve listed one on my Etsy shop. There’ll be more shortly.

Sun hats

The winter has been brutal here in Sydney this year. But just when I was bracing for another month of coldness, spring is suddenly upon us, catching me totally off-guard. In our backyard, a newly planted lemon tree is about to blossom. Strawberry flowers are already blossoming. And the sun is getting noticeably brighter. Soon it’ll be another skin cancer season…. It’s time to make sun hats.

Last summer I made a few sun hats for my shop, but I was not completely happy with the pattern I made. The brim was too slope-y and bucket-like, and as cute as it was, it interfered with the child’s visual field. So, I went back to the drawing board today.

Let me warn you first: I have no idea how a professional pattern maker would make hat patterns. So please don’t copy me or quote me if you are researching how to make a hat pattern properly. I just wanted to share how I did this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you see, I already have a pattern for the crown part. For the brim, I first drew a rectangle for the brim, with the length representing the circumference of the hat. If you use this pattern for a hat as is, the brim would come straight down over your eyes like a ski mask, and you will be totally blindfolded.

Next I arbitrarily divided the brim rectangle up into small sections. I then cut out the big rectangle, and made slits along these little lines almost till the end, leaving just a tiny bit uncut so the whole thing still held together as one piece. Then you can fan it out like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you make a complete circle like this, and trace over the pattern, I’d imagine your brim will sit about 90 degrees from your face – like a shower hat (or how do you call those things you attach to your child’s head so you can wash her hair without the water getting into her eyes?).

I wanted a brim with a gentle downward slope, so I was aiming for something like a 45-degree angle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This took a long time, ensuring that all the little pieces were spaced out evenly…. When I finally had them positioned where I wanted, I roughly traced around the whole shape, then smoothed out the rough edges into a nice curved shape.

Then I tweaked the pattern a little more to make sure the lines were smooth and the circumference matched with that of the crown. Then I added seam allowance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The work-in-progress pattern above is for half a brim.

When the pattern is done, it’s Judgment Time – time to make a sample. Here, too, is where I am a total amateur. Instead of using muslin, I can’t help using a nice fabric for my sample sewing. Because I am eternally hopeful that, in the event it all works out perfectly the first time, I will have a lovely hat I can use straight away. Although I should know by now that things almost never work out perfectly the first time. That is why my children often wear crooked or ill-fitting samples. Because I’m too cheap to throw them away. See, I never seem to learn.

But today I got lucky! Yes the first sample had problems — the brim was too long and didn’t match up with the crown, and the angle was a little off. But after I ripped the brim off, I was able to salvage the fabric by re-cutting it using a revised pattern.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A finished toddler sun hat in Miss M’s size. It’s lined with solid pink cotton. After yesterday’s apron-rejection fiasco, I didn’t want to argue with a three-year-old’s favoured colour choice. See, I need her to wear a hat – any hat – in this country of harsh sun and skin cancer.

I do enjoy making hats. Something about all these flat pieces ending up nice and round and 3-D – gives me a lot of satisfaction. Off to make some more for my neglected online shop and for the upcoming Mathilda’s Market.

Introducing…. a perfect bib

It took me a long time to make bibs for my shop — because, aside from the fact that everyone else was making it, I am not a big fan of bibs. Bibs basically look all the same, they cost about the same, and frankly, they all look silly and undignified on kids no matter how you dress them up with pretty fabric. In fact, the prettier the fabric, the sadder it looked to me. And plastic bibs? Total abomination.

That’s why I hardly ever used bibs for Miss M when she was little. I made her a few bibs for her mealtime mess, but even then, I preferred to dress her in aprons instead, or I just resigned to washing her clothes more often. It didn’t bother me.

Then Mr. A turned up, and he was a natural-born drooler and spit-upper. As a breastfeeding baby, you could count on him to spit up every single time, staining not only his clothes but also mine, the feeding pillow, and the bedding below. In between feedings he drooled buckets, especially once he started teething. I was amazed how fast his clothes got soaked wet, and poor thing, if I didn’t change him fast enough he would develop rashes. So for Mr. A, a bib was a sheer necessity. A survival item even.

Now, while I still think bibs look silly, at least I understand why parents need them. So, with that in mind, I strove to make a perfect bib for my shop. A perfect bib would be:

  • comfortable for little ones to wear – must be lightweight and extremely soft around the neck.
  • absorbent! A bib is no good if a stream of drool rolls right past the surface to soak the tummy area.
  • offer good coverage without making your little one look like a frill necked lizard.
  • cute but in an understated way.
  • closed by a snap: easy to put on and off, but difficult for little hands to yank it off.
  • versatile – from newborn to toddler, and for messy eaters and well as droolers (or both).

And here it is — a perfect bib!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you know this is the softest, lightest, and super absorbent 100% cotton double gauze from Japan. For the backing, I used organic cotton jersey, which is not only light and incredibly soft, but also absorbent. It has a beautiful white colour. If you wore this around your neck, you wouldn’t want to take it off because it’s so warm and cozy. The adorable elephants print is just sweet enough for little ones without being a try-hard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is pretty large for babies, offering great coverable. And you can use it all the way through toddlerhood and beyond (if you wish) — here is Miss M loving the pink elephants bib.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does wearing matching bibs foster sibling love? Or wait, is Miss M saying “go away, it’s my photo shoot”?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which colour is your favourite? The bibs are now available in my shop.